What the website says…

Hepworths are award winning brewers of Craft and contemporary beers made with the honed skills of craftsmen… our success is attributable to the high quality of our ingredients, the traditional methods we employ and the long experience that results in the perfect pint.

Our take on Hepworth Brewery…

Hepworth isn’t one of those names that you see on the pumps around town that often, and in fact the only place we have seen it regularly available is at the Brighton Dome venue where it seems to be the brewer of choice. Not having been exposed much to Hepworth’s options, we were really surprised when we started our research to learn how varied their range is – from classic ales to modern pales spanning keg and cask, plus a lager and even a couple of low/no alcohol options.

In speaking to founder Andy Hepworth it becomes clear just how steeped in Sussex the brewery is, actively sourcing from suppliers and contractors that are as local as they can possibly be, and depicting recognisable Sussex imagery on its bottles. The beers have no additives, and the process is very traditional – mostly gluten free and carefully quality managed. No wonder Hepworth was chosen to be the Sussex ale in Higgidy pies! Produce is incredibly sustainable, and the new brewery – completed in 2016 – uses reed beds to handle effluent and solar panels to power the world’s first ‘beer source heat pump’.This not only heats the offices – which are A+ buildings anyway – but preheats the water for brewing, cutting boiler fuel consumption  by 20%.

Traditional ale drinkers are bound to find something to love from Hepworth’s cask or seasonal selections, but for younger and modern beer drinkers there seems to be plenty going on to cater for that market as well, with canning planned for 2021.

 

A bit of history…

Andy Hepworth, Director, Founder and Head Brewer, did his training at Courage before launching Hepworth in 2001. The first beer brewed was Pullman Best Bitter, followed soon after by Organic Lager which is brewed with barley from the Goodwood Estate. The focus was on bottling rather than draught, and before long the brewery was producing 40,000 bottles a day – and picking up brewing contracts from some big national names, reviving Hen’s Tooth for Greene King and Worthington White Shield for Bass.

Staff numbers have grown from four to 30 over the years, and in 2016 Hepworth’s brand new and sustainably designed brewery was completed. This allowed the brewery to expand production threefold, and to both open a shop on site and offer tours. The next step for the brewery is canning, which is expected to begin this year (2021).

 

How local is Hepworth?

Hepworth’s brewery, like many others in our listings, is based out in rural West Sussex. You’ll find it on the A29 between Pulborough and Billingshurst.

 

Our favourites 🍺

A beer that really stood out for us when going through Hepworth’s range was Crazy Horse APA, a 5% pale made with Chinook and Cascade hops. Probably one of the brewer’s more contemporary options, this was more of a grower than an instant hit; but by the end of the bottle it had really won us over – a ‘dark horse’, you might say. There’s silky smoothness, slight creaminess in the mouthfeel and beautiful balance of stone fruit and summer barley. It’s not overly hopped, with not too much citrus – just really clean and refreshing, with enough flavour to make it stand out from the crowd.

At the other end of the flavour scale is Classic Old Ale. This pitch-black classic is a real winter treat, sweet with molasses and toasted hazelnut. It’s light in mouthfeel and not rich or overwhelming, finishing with flavours of oat and oak rather than full-on bitterness. It drinks really easy, and the 4.8% strength allows you to enjoy more than one without regretting it.

 

hepworth brewery logo small

Stane Street
Pulborough
West Sussex
RH20 1DJ

01403 269696

hepworth-brewery-crazy-horse-IPA
hepworth-brewery-classic-old-ale
hepworth brewery logo small

Stane Street
Pulborough
West Sussex
RH20 1DJ

01403 269696

What the website says…

Hepworths are award winning brewers of Craft and contemporary beers made with the honed skills of craftsmen… our success is attributable to the high quality of our ingredients, the traditional methods we employ and the long experience that results in the perfect pint.

Our take on Hepworth Brewery…

Hepworth isn’t one of those names that you see on the pumps around town that often, and in fact the only place we have seen it regularly available is at the Brighton Dome venue where it seems to be the brewer of choice. Not having been exposed much to Hepworth’s options, we were really surprised when we started our research to learn how varied their range is – from classic ales to modern pales spanning keg and cask, plus a lager and even a couple of low/no alcohol options.

In speaking to founder Andy Hepworth it becomes clear just how steeped in Sussex the brewery is, actively sourcing from suppliers and contractors that are as local as they can possibly be, and depicting recognisable Sussex imagery on its bottles. The beers have no additives, and the process is very traditional – mostly gluten free and carefully quality managed. No wonder Hepworth was chosen to be the Sussex ale in Higgidy pies! Produce is incredibly sustainable, and the new brewery – completed in 2016 – uses reed beds to handle effluent and solar panels to power the world’s first ‘beer source heat pump’.This not only heats the offices – which are A+ buildings anyway – but preheats the water for brewing, cutting boiler fuel consumption  by 20%.

Traditional ale drinkers are bound to find something to love from Hepworth’s cask or seasonal selections, but for younger and modern beer drinkers there seems to be plenty going on to cater for that market as well, with canning planned for 2021.

 

A bit of history…

Andy Hepworth, Director, Founder and Head Brewer, did his training at Courage before launching Hepworth in 2001. The first beer brewed was Pullman Best Bitter, followed soon after by Organic Lager which is brewed with barley from the Goodwood Estate. The focus was on bottling rather than draught, and before long the brewery was producing 40,000 bottles a day – and picking up brewing contracts from some big national names, reviving Hen’s Tooth for Greene King and Worthington White Shield for Bass.

Staff numbers have grown from four to 30 over the years, and in 2016 Hepworth’s brand new and sustainably designed brewery was completed. This allowed the brewery to expand production threefold, and to both open a shop on site and offer tours. The next step for the brewery is canning, which is expected to begin this year (2021).

 

How local is Hepworth?

Hepworth’s brewery, like many others in our listings, is based out in rural West Sussex. You’ll find it on the A29 between Pulborough and Billingshurst.

 

Our favourites 🍺

A beer that really stood out for us when going through Hepworth’s range was Crazy Horse APA, a 5% pale made with Chinook and Cascade hops. Probably one of the brewer’s more contemporary options, this was more of a grower than an instant hit; but by the end of the bottle it had really won us over – a ‘dark horse’, you might say. There’s silky smoothness, slight creaminess in the mouthfeel and beautiful balance of stone fruit and summer barley. It’s not overly hopped, with not too much citrus – just really clean and refreshing, with enough flavour to make it stand out from the crowd.

At the other end of the flavour scale is Classic Old Ale. This pitch-black classic is a real winter treat, sweet with molasses and toasted hazelnut. It’s light in mouthfeel and not rich or overwhelming, finishing with flavours of oat and oak rather than full-on bitterness. It drinks really easy, and the 4.8% strength allows you to enjoy more than one without regretting it.

 

hepworth-brewery-crazy-horse-IPA
hepworth-brewery-classic-old-ale

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