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Brighton Beer Blog review The Dyke Alehouse & Kitchen, Brighton

Read a beer-by-beer account of our visit

The Date: Saturday 28th September 2019
The Beers: Cloak & Dagger Komodo Bozo, Veterans Brewing No Man’s Land Best Bitter, Beavertown Neck Oil

Back from the brink of extinction, the The Dyke‘s saga stretches back almost as far as another political epic we won’t mention.

It’s had all the ingredients of a ’rather niche’ TV drama: sudden closure, identity crisis (as a furniture emporium), threats of residential conversion and a campaign to save the pub and turn it into a community asset. Yet until earlier this year the future seemed bleak for the former 19th century coaching inn and hotel.

Thankfully this popular community boozer has been reopened, refurbished and revitalised. Occupying half the space of the previous incarnation, the new Dyke proves the old adage that good things can come in small(er) packages.

The mix of modern and traditional decor is well balanced with the many period features tastefully highlighted and a beautiful new bar overlooking a range of high tables towards the front. A large fireplace surrounded by club-style leather chairs looks very inviting, and at the back a section of regular table set-ups provide a flexible space for groups of all sizes.

There has been a small area outside the front for some alfresco imbibing, but given the current weather this seems to have disappeared for now. Despite a quick search we couldn’t find a door to a garden, so perhaps that is a sacrifice of the downsizing.

On the bar there’s a great range on offer to suit all tastes. To the right of the bar are the usual suspects including Amstel, Kronenburg and Guinness. On the other set of taps sits an eclectic selection of Pig And Porter Ltd‘s Whispering Bob IPA, @Lagunitas, Cloak and Dagger Brewing‘s Komodo Bozo and Beavertown Brewery‘s Neck Oil. Cask options include the landlord’s own Veterans Brewing.

We dive into Cloak and Dagger’s Komodo Bozo, a light, well balanced, more-ish session IPA with bags of flavour. Next we sample Veterans’ No Man’s Land Best; it’s a dense, smokey and nutty number, smooth to an extent but with a sharp charcoal finish.
We finish up with Beavertown’s Neck Oil, which rarely disappoints. This slightly sweeter session IPA has a hoppy tang and is full-bodied, despite the lower ABV.

Two of the keg taps are on weekly rotation, giving an airing to a variety of local brewers. On a second visit in as many weeks we try Hairy Dog Brewery‘s Far Fetched Pale Ale. This is a tasty session pale with a hoppy bite and a satisfyingly dry finish. We have more than one!

We’re told that food service will commence on the 21st October and will include roasts as well as pub favourites. The icing on the cake for this pub is the genuinely friendly and chatty bar staff. Everyone is made to feel welcome – children and dogs included – which adds to this pub’s community vibe.

All in all, then, the new Dyke is a winner. A balance of old and new and something for everyone: just what a successful pub should be. A warm welcome back to the Dyke, and all the best from Brighton Beer Blog.

What do the locals think of the new Dyke Alehouse and Kitchen? When they launch the food, please come back and tell us your thoughts.

 

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The Date: Saturday 28th September 2019
The Beers: Cloak & Dagger Komodo Bozo, Veterans Brewing No Man’s Land Best Bitter, Beavertown Neck Oil

Back from the brink of extinction, the The Dyke‘s saga stretches back almost as far as another political epic we won’t mention.

It’s had all the ingredients of a ’rather niche’ TV drama: sudden closure, identity crisis (as a furniture emporium), threats of residential conversion and a campaign to save the pub and turn it into a community asset. Yet until earlier this year the future seemed bleak for the former 19th century coaching inn and hotel.

Thankfully this popular community boozer has been reopened, refurbished and revitalised. Occupying half the space of the previous incarnation, the new Dyke proves the old adage that good things can come in small(er) packages.

The mix of modern and traditional decor is well balanced with the many period features tastefully highlighted and a beautiful new bar overlooking a range of high tables towards the front. A large fireplace surrounded by club-style leather chairs looks very inviting, and at the back a section of regular table set-ups provide a flexible space for groups of all sizes.

There has been a small area outside the front for some alfresco imbibing, but given the current weather this seems to have disappeared for now. Despite a quick search we couldn’t find a door to a garden, so perhaps that is a sacrifice of the downsizing.

On the bar there’s a great range on offer to suit all tastes. To the right of the bar are the usual suspects including Amstel, Kronenburg and Guinness. On the other set of taps sits an eclectic selection of Pig And Porter Ltd‘s Whispering Bob IPA, @Lagunitas, Cloak and Dagger Brewing‘s Komodo Bozo and Beavertown Brewery‘s Neck Oil. Cask options include the landlord’s own Veterans Brewing.

We dive into Cloak and Dagger’s Komodo Bozo, a light, well balanced, more-ish session IPA with bags of flavour. Next we sample Veterans’ No Man’s Land Best; it’s a dense, smokey and nutty number, smooth to an extent but with a sharp charcoal finish.
We finish up with Beavertown’s Neck Oil, which rarely disappoints. This slightly sweeter session IPA has a hoppy tang and is full-bodied, despite the lower ABV.

Two of the keg taps are on weekly rotation, giving an airing to a variety of local brewers. On a second visit in as many weeks we try Hairy Dog Brewery‘s Far Fetched Pale Ale. This is a tasty session pale with a hoppy bite and a satisfyingly dry finish. We have more than one!

We’re told that food service will commence on the 21st October and will include roasts as well as pub favourites. The icing on the cake for this pub is the genuinely friendly and chatty bar staff. Everyone is made to feel welcome – children and dogs included – which adds to this pub’s community vibe.

All in all, then, the new Dyke is a winner. A balance of old and new and something for everyone: just what a successful pub should be. A warm welcome back to the Dyke, and all the best from Brighton Beer Blog.

What do the locals think of the new Dyke Alehouse and Kitchen? When they launch the food, please come back and tell us your thoughts.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

0 Comments

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *